we're all stories, in the end

j0ye:

I took this picture of Oli and myself today at the pool. After we got done swimming, we were walking home and had to pass by a group of cheerleaders that were practicing on my uni’s campus. One of the cheerleaders looked at Oliver and said, “She’s so cute!” With a smile on my face, I ruffled Oli’s hair and said, “HE.” as we continued walking past her. Immediately the girl winced, turned to her friend, and said, “Oh my god, she’s turning him gay..”
I am not turning my son gay by allowing him to express himself by wearing a floral dress. I’m so sick of people making comments that I’m altering my son’s sexual orientation or his gender identity because he’s wearing a dress. IT’S A DRESS. IT IS LITERALLY CLOTHING. If he is gay, that’s cool, I’ll accept him no matter what, and if he decides at any point he’s anything but a boy, I’ll still accept him (er, them/her). But allowing him to pick out his own clothes and taking him clothes shopping with me so he can pick out what he likes is not going to have ANY affect on his orientation/identity. The only concern I have about him wearing a dress is when he pulls it up to show me how big his tummy is in public, because I don’t want him showing a bunch of strangers his underwear.
If he was a little girl wearing a pair of shorts or a t-shirt with a dump truck on it, no one would say anything, because dressing as a boy is different. People see wearing a dress as a negative thing when you’re a boy, they say he’ll turn gay and that I’m a bad mom and I’m trying to turn him into a girl. But the bottom line is that him wearing a dress has nothing to do with being a boy or his orientation. If he’s gay, he’s gay. He’s too young to slap a sexuality on him at 3 and a half, and that’s not something I’m particularly worried about, because at this age he treats everybody the same and doesn’t have comprehension of what sexual/romantic attraction is. Wearing a dress has nothing to do with that.
He is a boy. He plays with dump trucks, rolls around in dirt, growls at everyone, and pretends to fart for fun. He also paints his nails, is obsessed with Sailor Moon, refers to himself as Princess Oliver, and yes, wears dresses. He is a boy.

j0ye:

I took this picture of Oli and myself today at the pool. After we got done swimming, we were walking home and had to pass by a group of cheerleaders that were practicing on my uni’s campus. One of the cheerleaders looked at Oliver and said, “She’s so cute!” With a smile on my face, I ruffled Oli’s hair and said, “HE.” as we continued walking past her. Immediately the girl winced, turned to her friend, and said, “Oh my god, she’s turning him gay..”

I am not turning my son gay by allowing him to express himself by wearing a floral dress. I’m so sick of people making comments that I’m altering my son’s sexual orientation or his gender identity because he’s wearing a dress. IT’S A DRESS. IT IS LITERALLY CLOTHING. If he is gay, that’s cool, I’ll accept him no matter what, and if he decides at any point he’s anything but a boy, I’ll still accept him (er, them/her). But allowing him to pick out his own clothes and taking him clothes shopping with me so he can pick out what he likes is not going to have ANY affect on his orientation/identity. The only concern I have about him wearing a dress is when he pulls it up to show me how big his tummy is in public, because I don’t want him showing a bunch of strangers his underwear.

If he was a little girl wearing a pair of shorts or a t-shirt with a dump truck on it, no one would say anything, because dressing as a boy is different. People see wearing a dress as a negative thing when you’re a boy, they say he’ll turn gay and that I’m a bad mom and I’m trying to turn him into a girl. But the bottom line is that him wearing a dress has nothing to do with being a boy or his orientation. If he’s gay, he’s gay. He’s too young to slap a sexuality on him at 3 and a half, and that’s not something I’m particularly worried about, because at this age he treats everybody the same and doesn’t have comprehension of what sexual/romantic attraction is. Wearing a dress has nothing to do with that.

He is a boy. He plays with dump trucks, rolls around in dirt, growls at everyone, and pretends to fart for fun. He also paints his nails, is obsessed with Sailor Moon, refers to himself as Princess Oliver, and yes, wears dresses. He is a boy.

(via freya-not-freyja)

j0ye:

thelilysparks:

It’s amazing that people will see a kid yelled at or manhandled by a parent and say “It’s not my business, you can’t tell someone how to raise their kid” but if someone lets their son wear a dress it’s a public discussion.

THIS IS VERY RELEVANT

(via artistofakind)

iamwizz:

When you can laugh during sex and not have it be awkward that’s when you know it’s real

(via freya-not-freyja)

onebay1:

SMELL LIKE A MAN
SPORT SCENT SO EVEN WHEN YOUR CLOTHES ARE CLEANED AFTER SPORTS YOU STILL SMELL LIKE SPORTS
SMELLING LIKE SPORTS MEANS YOU ARE A MAN BECAUSE ALL MEN PLAY SPORTS AND IF YOU DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE SPORTS SMELL YOU NEED TO MAN UP!
SMELL LIKE YOU CAN MAN AND ALSO LIKE YOU CAN SPORTS

onebay1:

SMELL LIKE A MAN

SPORT SCENT SO EVEN WHEN YOUR CLOTHES ARE CLEANED AFTER SPORTS YOU STILL SMELL LIKE SPORTS

SMELLING LIKE SPORTS MEANS YOU ARE A MAN BECAUSE ALL MEN PLAY SPORTS AND IF YOU DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE SPORTS SMELL YOU NEED TO MAN UP!

SMELL LIKE YOU CAN MAN AND ALSO LIKE YOU CAN SPORTS

(via artistofakind)

manasaysay:

rabbrakha:

Parineeti Chopra responds to a male reporter who claims to know nothing about periods (menstrual cycle). [X]

SO IMPORTANT.

I started my period when I was 10 years old. But we didn’t tell my grandma for three years because she subscribed to the “old traditions”, where a woman on her period could not enter the house, not even to bathe. Where she had to sit outside in front of the house (where the whole village could be witness to her shame and isolation) for the entire duration.

My friend started her period unexpectedly while we were at our local temple (in America) for dance class. Asking around if any of the parents had pads (all of them apologized and acted like adults about it), I thought surely the front office has a first aid kit. Don’t they have pads? When we asked, not only did they not have any, when one of the women gave one from her purse, the head secretary told us “There are men who need to use the first-aid kit, ya? So we don’t keep period things there.” Not even ibuprofen (which has so many more uses than period pain).

There are girls in India and Nepal (and other places, but I just read an in-depth piece about the situations in Nepal) who have to go to the “period hut” when their period comes and not leave until its over. They can’t wash and dry their cloth pads in the daylight, so they do it at night when the pads won’t dry properly before their next use, making them vulnerable to infection.

It is incredibly important, especially in India, to break the taboo surrounding periods. Break the secrecy around an event that happens to almost every woman, every month for literally half of her lifetime. Break the hiding, break the cover-up, break the SHAME.

Just break EVERYTHING. So little girls can go to school every day of every month without feeling ashamed. So women can work every day of every month to provide for their families without being glared at. So single fathers can confidently take care of their daughters’ health. So that women can talk about how terrible their period is or isn’t and give each other advice on how to deal with it without looking around to make sure men aren’t listening.
So that Whisper doesn’t have to be called Whisper, it can be called SHOUT. It can be called PROUD. So that we don’t NEED to fucking WHISPER about our bodies and our health.

(Source: baawri, via freya-not-freyja)

turkeyinacan:

shoutout to people working weekends and overnights and overtime, people working in hospitality and retail and food service, who are sacrificing time with their loved ones, so fuckers with weekday desk jobs get to live comfortably with the amenities we provide while simultaneously shitting all over us for not getting “real jobs”

(via doomslock)